“So Much Trouble In The World” (Diament Remaster)

I’m kicking off my weekend with my favorite Bob Marley tune “So Much Trouble In The World.”  This track from the ‘Survival’ album was remastered by audio engineer Barry Diament and is, in my opinion, the very best version available.  Seems like a very simple song on the surface, but it does have some deep roots.  Marley is a lyrical genius, and I don’t use that term flippantly.  Although the title suggests doom and gloom – a world filled with trouble – the lyrics are so positive and optimistic.  Check the opening verse:

“Bless my eyes this morning,
Jah sun is on the rise once again,
The way earthly thin’s are goin’,
Anything can happen.”

My favorite verse brings the listener back to reality:

“We’ve got to face the day,
Ooh-wee, come what may,
We the street people talkin’,
Yeah, we the people strugglin’.”

As Roger Steffens so eloquently explained during his multimedia presentation while touring with the Wailers on their recent ‘Survival’  tour, Marley hearkens back to the tune “Cornerstone.”

“So you think you’ve found the solution,
But it’s just another illusion!
So before you check out this time,
Please don’t leave another cornerstone
Standing there behind!”

In the original tune, Marley sings of the cornerstone as “the stone the builder refused.”  Here he pleads once again “[p]lease don’t leave another cornerstone standing there behind!”  This “callback” to the foundation tune was something I never really picked up on until Roger pointed it out.

One of Marley’s greatest tunes, without a doubt.  Marley knew that this song would always be relevant because he saw the world for what it was – a Babylonian prison where every man must do his time until we are released to live with the Almighty.

Kymani Marley does an amazing performance of this tune.

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Jackie Mittoo in Africa (Quartz, Limited Press) 1997

ANOTHER MIDNIGHT RAVER BLOG EXCLUSIVE!

I have included five selections from the album ‘Jackie Mittoo In Africa.’  This 1997 album from the obscure Quartz label, recorded in the mid-80s at the Black Note Recording Studio in Accra, Ghana, West Africa, was limited to 250 vinyl pressings.  While the raw tracks were recorded in Ghana, the album was finished in Birmingham where Mittoo was on tour with the Musical Youth.  The Musical Youth are the session players on the album, along with several African musicians who were lucky enough to be around when jackie was recording.  It is an interesting departure from the Jackie Mittoo we all know and love, and it’s not exactly vintage Jackie.  On this album, Mittoo ventures into the electronica realm, experimenting with new arrangements, and remixing some classics such as “Drum Song.”  I have read that Jackie Mittoo is the only Jamaican artist to record a full length album on African soil.

1. Play For The Prisoners
2. One Touch
3. All Night In Accra
4. No Show In Togo
5. Where Did Major Go (Remix)

MUSICIANS:

Bass – Patrick Waite
Drums – Duckie
Guitar – Bibi Dowuona, Nathan Fredus
Percussion – Noel Barnes
Producer – Toney Owens The 1st
Toasting – Ekow Brown

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SEECO Speaks plus Kaya Tour Rehearsal Sessions, Miami 1978

I have re-upped the Kaya Tour Rehearsal Sessions, Miami 1978!  The original post featured this rare interview that Roger Steffens conducted with Alvin “Seeco” Patterson at the Universal Amphitheatre, Los Angeles, 1991.

Long before The Wailers started recording, percussionist Alvin “Seeco” Patterson was one of the primary musical tutors for the vocal group, specializing in rhythm. Seeco, seeing that the trio could be molded into something great, brought the Wailers to the attention of Studio One owner Clement “Coxsone” Dodd. He even played congas for them as they auditioned for Coxsone, who eventually took them on as recording artists. He went on to become a roadie for The Wailers 1973/74 tours before becoming the longtime percussionist for The Wailers.  SEECO is sometimes credited as Francisco “Willie” Pep.

Prior to this, Patterson had a career in Jamaica’s “mento” music scene. In Stephen Davis’ biography, “Bob Marley“, it is revealed that Seeco, “played with Lord Flea and various mento-calypso combos”. Davis later describes the music Lord Flea played when Seeco was in the band as “mento jazz”.

The interview, conducted backstage in 1991 at the Universal Amphitheater in Los Angeles, is a real rarity.  Roger tells me that this is the first time it is seeing the light of day.  In the interview, Seeco tells the story of bringing Marley to his first audition at Coxsone. It’s a little hard to penetrate fully, but I think you will enjoy the challenge.

I have also re-upped the EXODUS/KAYA SCRATCH VOCAL DEMOS !

‘RIFFIN’ with Dermot Hussey

IF YOU HAVE NEVER TUNED INTO TO DERMOT HUSSEY’S ‘RIFFIN’, THEN YOU ARE MISSING THE VERY BEST IN REGGAE, WORLD, AND JAZZ!  DERMOT IS A CELEBRATED JAMAICAN BROADCASTER, HOST OF HIS OWN XM REGGAE RADIO SHOW ON THE JOINT XM, AND A DEAR FRIEND TO THIS BLOG!

RIFFIN’S EMAIL BLAST FOR WEEK 5/31/13
FRIDAYS: 7.00 PM JA TIME, 8.00 pm US
SUNDAYS: 5.10 pm JA Time, 6.10 pm US
LIVE STREAM: http://www.newstalk93fm.com/

THE FRIDAY RIFF 5/31, 7 pm EST: MORGAN HERITAGE
Harmonizes together again. Johnny Osborne’s ‘MR MARSHALL”
The sampler for MAJOR LAZER’S, ‘JAH NO PARTIAL”.
‘MASSIVE REBEL MUSIC’ by DUBMATIX from Canada.
The no 1 Reggae Album, according to Billboard
And I Tunes, by John Brown’s Body. The 35th Anniversay
Edition of KAYA by Bob Marley and The Wailers.

THE SUNDAY RIFF 5/5, 5.10 pm EST: 3 TRUMPETS:
Etienne Charles, Wallace Roney and Jo Burgstaller

Produced and Presented by Dermot Hussey